Learning Theories – EDUC6115 – Week 8 Reflection

What I find surprising about how people learn is how complicated it is. Despite the significant breadth of the field of learning theory, it is still insufficient to explain completely how a person learns. While pursuing my Master’s in Counseling I was required to undergo a battery of assessments – IQ, Personality and Aptitude assessments to name just a few. These assessments gave me my first insight into how I am structured – mentally, psychologically, intellectually, etc. At the completion of that degree I felt I had good insight into my learning processes. I am quite surprised to find how little I actually knew when compared to what I know now from completing this course. The theory we studied here and the practical applications are far more advanced and relevant and so much more applicable to the world we live in. I am armed with more relevant knowledge, knowledge I’ve been able to put to use immediately in my own approach to studying and learning. And still, everything we’ve studied goes only so far in explaining how people learn.

My understanding of my personal learning process has deepened in that I understand with conviction that I am no longer constrained to a particular learning style or set of strategies toward learning. During this course I practiced using visualization and mnemonics. I found both tools useful enough in supporting my learning objectives that I will continue to cultivate these techniques beyond this course. This real world application of the theory we studied in this course deepened not only my understanding about my personal learning process but the learning potential of all people.

What I’ve learned about the connection between learning theories, learning styles, educational technology, and motivation is that our best instructional design must be inclusive of the fullest range of learning theories and styles, it must capitalize on every available educational technology to achieve this objective of inclusivity, and doing so successfully is what is required to cultivate the necessary motivation for success.

I am confident that my learning in this course is going to be a cornerstone in all of my instructional design solutions. The theory acquired in this course will provided a foundation against which I can make judgments about instructional design solution selection. What I design will be directly influenced by my newfound and aforementioned understanding that all instruction must be inclusive of the fullest range of learning theories and styles, it must capitalize on every available educational technology to achieve the objective of inclusivity, and doing so successfully is what is required to cultivate the necessary motivation for success.

This has been a great class and a remarkable learning experience. I will always be grateful for what I learned this semester.

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About Darlene Loebel
Software consultant with 20 years experience in Software Engineering and graduate student in Instructional Design & Technology at Walden University.

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